Saturday, January 18, 2014

The In-Between Hour (Book Review)

Publication Information: Mira, Trade Paperback, January 2014
Genre: Fiction
Plot: Two lonely people who have suffered great loss come together when handsome, bestselling author Will Shepard comes to North Carolina to see his ailing father, Jacob who has been kicked out of a nursing home.   A volunteer art therapist from the facility suggests Will and Jacob rent the guest house of her friend, Hannah Linden, so they can work out Jacob’s future.  Hannah, a vet, has lost her parents and her husband (who left her for a male graduate student) and her older son has been hospitalized for depression.  Will’s situation is even worse: his five year old recently died in a car crash but because Jacob’s memory is failing Will is caught pretending the child is on an extended vacation.  Inevitably, Will and Hannah become friends but where can this relationship go when Hannah believes things happen for a reason and Will simply can’t face anything that reminds him of his son - will these conflicting mindsets, not to mention a significant age difference, keep them apart?

What I liked:  The author does a wonderful job depicting even minor characters, such as the condescending director of Hawk’s Ridge Retirement Community.  While I found Hannah’s sons very tedious, I really liked her friend Poppy whose kindness to Will’s father sets everything in motion and whose flamboyant style lightens the darkness permeating the book.   Jacob’s intermittent dementia and love of his family is very familiar to anyone who has dealt with such situations.  The author’s love of nature shines through in this story and had me regretting that I was too busy studying when in graduate school at Duke to explore the state.

What I disliked:  The shifting point of view from various characters was distracting, although it provided insight into what they are thinking.   I did not care for the way Will calls his father ‘the old man’ all the time but one of the things Hannah and Poppy teach him is to be more respectful and to gain understanding of what his father when through with Will’s erratic mother. 

The Title: Another thirty minutes and darkness would fall, but right now the house and the cottage were suspended between day and night, caught in that moment when nothing was defined and everything seemed possible.  Galen had written several poems about the gloaming, and she often found herself out in the woods with her camera at this time.  The French called it the blue hour; photographers called it the golden hour; Hannah called it the in-between hour.  It spoke of endings and beginnings.  And today, it spoke of promise for a better tomorrow.
Source:  I received this book from TLC Book Tours and you can visit other stops on Barbara's tour listed below to get different perspectives.  TLC is providing a copy for me to give away (US only) so please leave a comment if you'd like it!  If there's more than one request, I will do a lottery.

Tuesday, December 31st: bookchickdi
Thursday, January 2nd: Bibliotica
Monday, January 6th: cupcake’s book cupboard
Tuesday, January 7th: Kritters Ramblings
Wednesday, January 8th: Tina’s Book Reviews
Thursday, January 9th: Chronicles …
Tuesday, January 14th: Becca Rowan
Wednesday, January 15th: From the TBR Pile
Friday, January 17th: Peeking Between the Pages
Friday, January 17th: Not in Jersey
Tuesday, January 21st: Sweet Tea and Lollipops
Wednesday, January 22nd: Sharon’s Garden of Book Reviews
Friday, January 24th: Diary of a Stay at Home Mom
Monday, January 27th: As I turn the pages
Tuesday, January 28th: Book Journey
Wednesday, January 29th: Found Between the Covers
Thursday, January 30th: Good Girl Gone Redneck


Barbara Claypole White said...

Thanks for reading and reviewing.

Heather J @ TLC Book Tours said...

Thanks for being a part of the tour!